Search Standards

Standard Name STAAR Student Expectation
K.1.A use one-to-one correspondence and language such as more than, same number as, or two less than to describe relative sizes of sets of concrete objects;
K.1.B use sets of concrete objects to represent quantities given in verbal or written form (through 20); and
Resource ID Author Select Subject(s) Grade Title
TEKS12_MATH_K_001 bgraham Mathematics Kindergarten

Representing Whole Number Quantities

This activity provides an opportunity for students to represent whole numbers with pictures.

K.1.C use numbers to describe how many objects are in a set (through 20) using verbal and symbolic descriptions.
K.2.A use language such as before or after to describe relative position in a sequence of events or objects; and
K.2.B name the ordinal positions in a sequence such as first, second, third, etc.
K.3.A share a whole by separating it into two equal parts; and
K.3.B explain why a given part is half of the whole.
K.4.A The student is expected to model and create addition and subtraction problems in real situations with concrete objects.
K.5.A The student is expected to identify, extend, and create patterns of sounds, physical movement, and concrete objects.
K.6.A use patterns to predict what comes next, including cause-and-effect relationships; and
K.6.B count by ones to 100.
K.7.A describe one object in relation to another using informal language such as over, under, above, and below; and
K.7.B place an object in a specified position.
K.8.A describe and identify an object by its attributes using informal language;
K.8.B compare two objects based on their attributes; and
K.8.C sort a variety of objects including two- and three-dimensional geometric figures according to their attributes and describe how the objects are sorted.
K.9.A describe and compare the attributes of real-life objects such as balls, boxes, cans, and cones or models of three-dimensional geometric figures;
K.9.B recognize shapes in real-life three-dimensional geometric figures or models of three-dimensional geometric figures; and
K.9.C describe, identify, and compare circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares (a special type of rectangle).
K.10.A compare and order two or three concrete objects according to length (longer/shorter than, or the same);
K.10.B compare the areas of two flat surfaces of two-dimensional figures (covers more, covers less, or covers the same);
K.10.C compare two containers according to capacity (holds more, holds less, or holds the same);
K.10.D compare two objects according to weight/mass (heavier than, lighter than or equal to); and
K.10.E compare situations or objects according to relative temperature (hotter/colder than, or the same as).
K.11.A compare events according to duration such as more time than or less time than;
K.11.B sequence events (up to three); and
K.11.C read a calendar using days, weeks, and months.
K.12.A construct graphs using real objects or pictures in order to answer questions; and
K.12.B use information from a graph of real objects or pictures in order to answer questions.
K.13.A identify mathematics in everyday situations;
K.13.B solve problems with guidance that incorporates the processes of understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;
K.13.C select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, or acting it out in order to solve a problem; and
K.13.D use tools such as real objects, manipulatives, and technology to solve problems.
K.14.A communicate mathematical ideas using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology; and
K.14.B relate everyday language to mathematical language and symbols.
K.15.A The student is expected to justify his or her thinking using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology.
1.1.A compare and order whole numbers up to 99 (less than, greater than, or equal to) using sets of concrete objects and pictorial models;
1.1.B create sets of tens and ones using concrete objects to describe, compare, and order whole numbers;
1.1.C identify individual coins by name and value and describe relationships among them; and
1.1.D read and write numbers to 99 to describe sets of concrete objects.
1.2.A separate a whole into two, three, or four equal parts and use appropriate language to describe the parts such as three out of four equal parts; and
1.2.B use appropriate language to describe part of a set such as three out of the eight crayons are red.
1.3.A model and create addition and subtraction problem situations with concrete objects and write corresponding number sentences; and
1.3.B use concrete and pictorial models to apply basic addition and subtraction facts (up to 9 + 9 = 18 and 18 - 9 = 9).
1.4.A The student is expected to identify, describe, and extend concrete and pictorial patterns in order to make predictions and solve problems.
1.5.A use patterns to skip count by twos, fives, and tens;
1.5.B find patterns in numbers, including odd and even;
1.5.C compare and order whole numbers using place value;
1.5.D use patterns to develop strategies to solve basic addition and basic subtraction problems; and
1.5.E identify patterns in related addition and subtraction sentences (fact families for sums to 18) such as 2 + 3 = 5, 3 + 2 = 5, 5 - 2 = 3, and 5 - 3 = 2.
Resource ID Author Select Subject(s) Grade Title
TEKS12_MATH_01_001 bgraham Mathematics 1

Finding Fact Families

In these activities students will explore and identify patterns in related addition and subtractions number sentences.

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